11/13/09

Debating Playing Cards With the Murder of Human Action


Community is still funny in "Debate 109," I'm getting bored with FlashForward in "Playing Cards With Coyote," The Office was hilariously depressing in "Murder," and in "Of Human Action," Fringe... WTF?

Welcome to another EXPLOSIVE edition of The Day After.

I'm starting to think that maybe Community isn't really a show that lends itself well to a weekly review. It's hilarious and it continues to be consistently hilarious. We should probably just set a constant precedent that you should definitely watch Community. In this episode, Jeff, who used to be a professional lawyer, takes on the City College's debate team with Annie, Pierce helps Britta quit smoking through hypnotherapy and everyone finds out about Abed's prophetic movies.

FlashForward, on the other hand... ::sigh:: I really wanted this show to be good. I figured if it's trying to take the place of LOST, then it has to have some sort of appeal. Well, that appeal is the Flash Forwards themselves. And the show milks those for more than they're worth. I admit along with those who were critical of the show before it began: there's only so much you can do with an incident that occurs at the beginning of the series for just over two minutes. In this episode, Lloyd and Charlie Simon play poker together in order to decide whether or not they tell the world that they're responsible for the blackouts. The game is much like the series in that you don't really know what's happening, you don't care, and the stakes are never really raised.

The Office has run into a bit of a predicament that I'll have to get into in the spoilers. But because of this huge incident, Michael decides it would be a good idea to play a murder mystery game set in the deep south. Naturally, Jim is opposed to this idea. So the whole episode turns out to be a study in the dynamics of co-bossing, which is rather blatantly paralleled to parenting near the end. What's depressing about this episode may only be depressing to me. I find that engaging in activities that only help to ignore the huge problem set before you is even more depressing than actually dealing with the problem.

It's pretty easy to pick out the major themes in any given episode of Fringe. In this one, it was the father/son dynamic... as well as the Massive Dynamic. When the team finds that a 15-year-old boy was kidnapped involving the use of mind control, all roads lead right back to Massive Dynamic where his father works as one of their top research scientists. This episode is Fringe getting right back to their standard mind-game plot. You find yourself saying "What's going on?" and then "Oh, that's going on..." and then "Wait, what??" In that order, several times. Admittedly, the main plot of this episode was fairly easy to predict, but the very end just throws you for a wild loop. Kinda like the end of Raiders of the Lost Ark. Except you knew Indiana Jones wasn't ever going to go back to that warehouse. Ever. Not even once. Ever again. It's locked. Not even magnetic alien skulls would bring him back... >.> To be clear, this was a solid episode of Fringe and was quite enjoyable. A+++ WOULD WATCH AGAIN.